Medical Malpractice Archives

Medical Malpractice

CAN I SUE A PHYSICIAN FOR MEDICAL MALPRACTICE IF MY LOVED ONE DIES AS A RESULT OF THE DOCTOR'S NEGLIGENCE?

Yes. Under the Illinois Wrongful Death Act, the beneficiaries of a deceased person's estate can maintain a cause of action for their loved one's death. Beneficiaries can recover for loss of financial support, grief, loss of companionship, loss of affection, and the overall loss of a loved one's presence in their lives. These damages compensate both the monetary injuries caused by the passing of an individual that was supporting their children, grand-children, etc., and also compensates the devastating effects that losing a mother, father, brother, sister, or child far too soon have upon a family.

Chicago Woman Awarded $14 Million Following Botched Surgery Resulting in Brain Damage

How are damages typically calculated in a medical malpractice case?


Medical malpractice claims often appear to be among the most lucrative of personal injury cases. However, these high-dollar verdicts are quite often deceiving, as juries are routinely tasked with compensating the victim for his or her entire life, including the costs of lifelong medical care, lost wages, lost opportunities, and a reduced quality of life. In one recent case, an Indiana woman was awarded $14 million by a Chicago jury after a lengthy trial involving allegations of severely-botched medical procedures, resulting in lifelong brain damage for the 56-year old victim. According to the lawsuit filed against both the Advocate Good Samaritan hospital - located in Downers Grove, Illinois - and her physicians individually, the victim underwent a bariatric surgery resulting in permanent brain damage, conclusively due to the negligence of both doctors involved. In 2010, the patient sought the medical counsel of both doctors for the treatment of obesity. Accordingly, she was scheduled for a gastric bypass procedure wherein a portion of the stomach is restricted to decrease the amount of food the patient can consume. Knowing she was taking a blood thinning medication, the doctors ordered an anti-coagulant (or so they thought) to be administered prior to the procedure. In fact, the doctors negligently ordered the wrong medication and the patient suffered extensive internal bleeding, causing her to permanently lose mental cognition. While the hospital settled with the woman privately for $5 million, the doctors opted to take their case to trial. During the proceeding, the patient testified that she is no longer able to walk, and relies on the round-the-clock assistance of her family to provide for her daily needs. Moreover, she stated that she is no longer able to homeschool any of her four children, and that her marriage relationship has suffered irretrievably as a result of the incident. In order to compensate the victim for her losses, a Chicago jury awarded her another $9 million to ensure her medical care, lost wages, lost future opportunities, and pain and suffering were adequately redressed. As one of Chicago's premier personal injury and medical malpractice law firms, we can help you if you are facing a situation similar to that described above. To learn more about the medical malpractice lawsuit process, please call (847) 244-1436.

Anesthesia Accidents

Medical errors involving negligent administration of anesthetics or improper monitoring of patients that are sedated can have catastrophic consequences. If you or a loved one has been harmed due to an anesthesia error, please contact Ryan, Ryan & Landa for a free consultation immediately. We are well versed in Illinois law which that an anesthesia care team appropriately sedate, monitor, and safeguard all patients during surgical procedures. We will ensure your full recovery. 

Daughter Sues Doctor Who Failed to Tell Father of Cancer

A doctor's failure to communicate essential information to a patient can be as harmful as prescribing the wrong medication or botching a surgical procedure. According to a medical malpractice lawsuit filed in Cook County, Illinois, a Lyons man died because his doctor failed to inform him that he had bladder cancer.Edward Hines had gone to see to Dr. Alan Sadah, a urologist at an Oak Park clinic, for treatment of a bladder tumor. After removing the tumor, Dr. Sadah told Hines that he was free of cancer. One week after the 2011 procedure, a pathologist's report showed that Hines still had bladder cancer. In her lawsuit, Hines's daughter claims that Dr. Sadah never told her father. Hines did not discover his condition until a year later when he went back to the clinic complaining of pain and learned he had invasive bladder cancer. He died at the age of 58 in 2013, after chemotherapy and surgery to remove his bladder and prostate. Hines' daughter says that, once his father knew about the cancer, he did everything medically possible to treat it. She believes the outcome could have been different if he had not missed a year of treatment while the cancer spread. In documents filed in court in response to the lawsuit, Dr. Sadah presents a different view of events. He claims he told Hines that he had cancer but that Hines failed to follow up. He also says Hines did not ask for the pathology report.A physician Hines hired to review his treatment wrote that Dr. Sadah should have warned his patient about the high recurrence rate of bladder cancer and the need for vigilant monitoring and treatment. The reviewing physician also wrote that patients should be notified when a pathology report discloses serious problems and an appointment should be set up for them.A trial may be needed to decide whether Dr. Sadah's version can be believed or whether Hines was kept in the dark about his diagnosis until it was too late.If your health or the health of a loved one has been adversely affected by a doctor's failure to inform you of a condition, or by any other type of negligent treatment, you should seek the compensation you deserve. Ryan Ryan & Landa has represented clients in all types of medical malpractice suits. For a consultation, call (847)416-1989 today. 

Tort Reform Does Not Work

The Los Angeles Times recently published an article discussing how "defensive medicine" caused by supposed fear of medical malpractice lawsuits constitutes a minor, insignificant portion of overall healthcare spending in the United States. This term refers to physicians ordering medically unnecessary diagnostic testing (and the like) solely out of an alleged fear of being sued.

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